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Could You Stay Alive In The Frigid Wilderness With Only The Supplies In Your Vehicle?

Could You Stay Alive In The Frigid Wilderness With Only The Supplies In Your Vehicle?.

This article was written by Daisy Luther and originally published at The Organic Prepper

How prepared are you to survive a few days in the frozen wilderness with only the supplies you have in your vehicle?

A family of 6 discovered that they have what it takes when their Jeep flipped over in the middle of the Seven Troughs mountain range in north-central Nevada last week.

Miraculously, the two adults and four children managed to escape the ordeal relatively unscathed, without even suffering frostbite. The family members included James Glanton, 34, Christina McIntee, 25, Shelby Schlag-Fitzpatrick, 10, Tate McIntee, 4, Evan Glanton, 5, and Chloe Glanton, 3.

James Glanton, a mine worker and hunter, showed true resourcefulness, and as one rescuer stated, “did one heck of job keeping those kids safe.” He immediately took charge of the situation and used his survival mentality to prevent his family from becoming victims. Headapted to the situation at hand by using what was available, and because of his decisive actions, succeeded in surviving in an event during which many would have perished.

All of the rescue workers were volunteers, who searched relentlessly for days for the family, with no state emergency funds forthcoming.  Some volunteers covered more than 700 miles looking for the missing family.

This real-life story is a perfect example of how disaster can strike when you least expect it.  As preppers and survivalists, what can we learn from James Glanton?  There were several items that I felt it necessary to add to my own vehicle kit after reading this story.

Identify your priorities

During any winter survival scenario, your priorities are:

  1. Shelter (including a means of staying warm)
  2. Water
  3. Food

Glanton said that immediately after the accident occurred, his first concern was to keep the family from freezing to death in the negative temperatures. He told reporters that he ”knew that they had to stay warm, and the first thing he did was build a fire and he was able to keep that fire going the entire time while they were out.”

Glanton then put large stones into the fire and heated them up.  He brought them into the vehicle and allowed the radiant heat to keep the family warm. (You can learn more about this techniqueHERE.)

Fortunately they had a supply of food and water in the vehicle because they had intended on spending a full day playing in the snow.

Decide whether to go for help or stay put and wait for rescue

Rescuers agreed that in this particular situation, the family’s survival hinged upon their decision to hunker down in the vehicle instead of setting off on foot to search for help.   With small children in tow, a storm brewing, and the remoteness of their location, a trek would have very likely been ill-fated.  They were 25 miles from the nearest town, so walking for help was really out of the question.

They were fortunate on several counts:

  1. People knew where they were going and when they were expected home.  When they did not arrive home as planned, search and rescue was alerted that they were missing.
  2. Rescuers were able to triangulate an approximate location from cellphone signals, even though the family was out of range at the accident site. This helped to narrow down the search area.

The take-away from this? Always make sure someone knows where to look for you. Also, invest in some signalling devices to help searchers locate you. (This is something that Glanton did not have.)  Consider adding flares to your survival kit, or make something large out of found objects to place on top of the snow to catch the attention of planes searching the area.

The family was located when a sharp-eyed searcher saw their Jeep upside down in the snow.

The right supplies are vital

Without the supplies that the family had on hand, their chances of survival would have diminished greatly.

  1. Glanton had a magnesium fire-starter and hacksaw in the vehicle – this allowed him to make a fire with the damp wood they found in the area.
  2. They had food and water, which they carefully rationed.
  3. The family was clothed for a day playing outside in freezing temperatures, so they had the right clothing for the environment.

The ingenuity of how they survived

Making the best of a terrifying situation, James Glanton used resourcefulness and ingenuity to keep his family safe and warm. Because the accident took place in a canyon housing an old mining site and they were able to use some items from the site to help them survive.

The artifacts left behind Wednesday — a burned tire, rocks and snow-packed footprints — told the great Nevada survival story.

The small canyon houses ghosts of an old mining camp with bedspring wiring, a rusty stove, pipes and what appeared to be steel roofing. A bent piece of steel was used to reflect heat for the fire where the vehicle flipped, said Charles Sparke, Pershing County emergency management director.

Officials say the family was prepared for a day in the snow. Glanton even brought a magnesium fire starter, which can turn wet twigs into ready-to-light kindling, Sparke said Wednesday.

He also had a hacksaw, which he used to cut kindling, and a spare tire to burn.

The Jeep was removed from the scene Wednesday. Inside the vehicle remained an old lighter and burned doors. Officials said Glanton burned rocks and put them inside the Jeep to keep the family warm. (source)

Are you ready?

If such an accident occurred, how would you and your family survive?  Do you have all of the necessary supplies to hunker down for a few days in frigid temperatures?

Here are the minimum supplies you should have in your vehicle at all times:

Bug-out Bags

Fully loaded backpacks with the basics of survival should always be handy in the even that you do have to hike away from the scene of an accident.  Additionally, have cash in small denominations for other types of emergencies.

Food and Water

You should always have some non-perishable foods in the vehicle, and water filtration equipment as well as water, in the event that your emergency lasts for an extended period of time.

  • Crackers
  • Peanut butter
  • Canned stew or chili
  • Canned baked beans
  • Canned fruit
  • Cookies
  • Granola Bars
  • 10 gallons of water
  • Berkey-to-go for each family member (or other portable filtration device)

Vehicle Emergency Kit

This should always remain in the vehicle:

  • Sleeping bags
  • Tent
  • Lighter, flint, waterproof matches
  • Lighter fluid (this can help start a fire even in damp conditions)
  • Candles
  • Hunting Knife
  • Compass
  • Pocket Survival book
  • Signal flares
  • Space blankets
  • Atlas
  • Flashlight
  • Extra batteries
  • Lantern
  • Mirrors for signalling
  • Whistles for making noise to help rescuers find you

First Aid Kit

Your kit should contain all of the basic items:

  • Bandages
  • Gauze
  • Pain relief pills
  • Antibiotic cream
  • Allergy medication and an Epi-pen (My daughter has a food allergy)
  • Alcohol wipes
  • Anti-diarrheal medication

Tools

A variety of tools should be on hand in the vehicle:

  • Basic automotive repair tools
  • Hammer
  • Prybar
  • Assorted screwdrivers
  • Pliers
  • Hacksaw
  • Hunting Knife

Extra clothing and footwear

Always keep spare clothing and footwear in the vehicle. Particularly in cold temperatures, dampness is the enemy. If your clothing or socks get wet, this greatly increases the risk of succumbing to exposure.

  • Snow pants
  • Coats
  • Long underwear
  • Socks
  • Gloves
  • Hats
  • Sturdy, comfortable walking boots

If you were in the same situation as the family who survived in the Nevada wilderness, how would you fare?  What items do you keep in your vehicle that would help you to survive?

 

SHTF Survival: How To Prevent Infections

SHTF Survival: How To Prevent Infections.

This article was written by Tess Pennington and originally published at Ready Nutrition

Storing medical supplies, especially antiseptic is a must when planning for an emergency event where hospitals and other types of medical care will be difficult to access. We all know that accidents happen, but when they get infected then they become life threatening.

Those that are preparing for short term and long term disasters more than likely have begun stocking up on certain supplies, such as bleach, water and baking soda mainly due to their versatility. But did you know that when these three items are combined together, they create a powerful antiseptic that can save a life? This antiseptic, otherwise known as Dakin’s Solution (diluted sodium hydrochlorite solution 0.5%) can be used to kill most bacterias and viruses.

This antiseptic was first discovered during World War I, when doctors on the battlefield were trying to find ways to kill germs and prevent bacterial related infections, such as gangrene and putrefacation from setting in. Doctors found that when they used Dakin’s solution before and after surgical procedures and for wound irrigation the patient’s condition improved. It was most beneficial after the wound had been adequately cleaned and foreign material and dead tissue had been removed.

Uses For Dakin’s Solution

  • Minor scrapes
  • Skin and tissue infections
  • Can be used before and after surgical procedures to prevent infection
  • Can be used as a mouth wash (should not be swallowed)
  • Used as a wound irrigator solution to clean wounds
  • Can be applied as a wet-to-moist dressing for wounds

Supplies Needed:

  • Sodium hydrochlorite solution at 5.25% (Bleach-unscented)
  • Baking soda
  • Clean tap water
  • Clean pan with lid
  • Sterile measuring cups and spoons
  • Sterile jar with a sterile lid
  • Label for jar to label antiseptic,date, time and discard date

 

To Make Solution:

 

1.  Wash your hands well with soap and water.
2.  Measure out 32 ounces (4 cups) of clean water.  Pour into a clean pan and allow water to boil for  15 minutes. Remove pan from heat.
3.  Using a sterile measuring spoon, add 1/2 tsp. of of baking soda to the water.
4. Measure the bleach according to the strength that is desired:

 

– For full strength – add 3 oz. bleach or 95 ml.
– For 1/2 strength – add 3 tbls. + 1/2 tsp. or 48 ml.
– For 1/4 strength – add 1 tbls. +2 tsp. or 24 ml.
– For 1/8 strength – add 2 1/2 tsp. or 12-14 ml.

 

5.  Place the solution in a jar and close it tightly with a sterile lid. Cover the closed jar with tin foil to protect it from sunlight.
6.  Throw away any unused portion of the antiseptic within 48 hours of use.  This solution can be made up to a month prior to using and stored away.

According to WebMD, “The body’s own wound-healing tissues and fluids can decrease the antibacterial effect of Dakin’s solution. Therefore, this solution is often used only once daily for minor wounds and twice daily for heavily draining or contaminated wounds… Additionally, protect the surrounding healthy skin with a moisture barrier ointment (i.e. petroleum jelly) or skin sealant as needed to prevent irritation.”

Additional Information on Dakins Solution

 

Are You Ready Series: Off Grid Refrigeration | The Daily Sheeple

Are You Ready Series: Off Grid Refrigeration | The Daily Sheeple. (source)

Three ice cubes on white background.

It is a fact that our entire way of  life is dependent upon gadgets of convenience and being tied to the grid.  The grid supplies us with electricity, provides air conditioning to cool our home, the home’s main water supply is pumped by a fuel source, and our food is kept cool and fresh by the refrigerator in your kitchen.  Did you know that your refrigerator consumes on average 8% of your monthly electric bill?  If  a sudden emergency were to occur, all the food in your refrigerator is spoiled.  Some individuals do not see this as a real threat to their well being.  However, the threat is real and entirely possible.

In an article at SHTF Plan, a physicist states that a solar flare is a real possibility and could pose a serious threat to our way of life.  This type of threat is such a concern that in the physicist’s own words believes, “We’d be thrown back 100 years.”

If we do find ourselves in a sudden long term emergency where the use of electricity is non-existent, what are our options as far as keeping food re-refrigerated?  Are you equipped and prepared to live in an environment where there is no electricity?  Many off-grid homesteaders have found a few solutions that could help us out of with this predicament and save us on our monthly electric bill.

Off-Grid Solutions for Refrigerating Food

Battery Powered Refrigerators – Many of the refrigerators that operate on 12v or 24v DC battery were designed for those that live on boats or in smaller living quarters such as an RV.  The DC motor compressor operates on 12 or 24 VDC.  In comparison, the average off-the-shelf refrigerator operates at 250v-300v.   However, a drawback to this type of refrigerator is the insulation walls can be quite thin making it inefficient in terms of preserving it’s fuel source.  Another drawback is these types of refrigerators are expensive and could be maintenance intensive.

Gas/Propane Refrigerators – gas or propane refrigerator has no moving parts and use gas or propane as their main energy source.  Many boats, RV and off-grid homes use this type of refrigeration method.   The average cost for a propane fridge is $800.  Many would argue that these types of refrigerators eat through gas, so plan on lots of trips to fill up on fuel. Of course, if you can afford a little extra, there are models that are “multi-fuel” — propane/AC, propane/DC, and propane/AC/DC (which might be the best way to go for “insurance” against possible shortage of one fuel/power supply).  Ideally it would be advisable for the homestead using this type of refrigerator to have a natural gas well in order to have a continual free source of fuel.

Solar Powered Refrigerator – These innovative types of refrigerators use evaporation to cool the box off.  Another type of solar powered refrigerator works with the help of a solar panel.  By creating electricity with the help of the solar panels, it then uses the electricity like a normal plug in refrigerator.  Battery free refrigerators such as the SunDanzer DDR165 Battery-Free DC can be hooked right into the solar panel.  Many believe that solar refridgerators are expensive, however, old refrigerators can be converted into solar powered refrigerators.  An article on Mother Earth News explains it all.  Layout Plans for a Solar Powered Ice Maker

 Prototypes – The prototype zero-emission fridge doesn’t need gas, propane or kerosene and is powered by regular fire.  According to an article on ecogeek, “At that point it begins to grow cold, and it is inserted into an insulated container of some sort of a jug, or even a hole in the ground. It gets colder and colder, bringing the temperature of the container to just above freezing, and keeping it that way for about 24 hours.”  It is also fairly affordable to.  At $40 per unit you can’t get any better than that!

Ice Houses – This is another alternative refrigeration source.  For more information on this refrigeration source, click here.

What  Do I Do With My Current Refrigerator?

If a long term emergency occurs and you no more have use for your electrically operated refrigerator, convert it into a solar dehydrator or a solar cooker.  It could also be used as a bulk storage container for preparations.  This would be a great way to keep bulk preparedness items like wheat out of contact with insects and temperature fluctuations.  Additionally, some feel that due to the zero oxygen inside the refrigerators can be used as an anaerobic digester to create bio-fuel.

Whether a person is planning for a hurricane, EMP or TEOTWAWKI, electricity or lack there of, will pose a problem to those that are not prepared.  There is a lot of great information out there regarding this topic.  Finding which alternative refrigerator source works best for your family, requires some researching on your part.  Here are some additional articles that may be helpful:

http://eveningrainfarm.com/2005/08/refrigeration-off-the-grid/

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/yago102.html

http://www.backwoodssolar.com/catalog/refrigerators.htm#SUNFROST

 

Why I Won’t Be Charitable When The SHTF | The Daily Sheeple

Why I Won’t Be Charitable When The SHTF | The Daily Sheeple. (FULL ARTICLE)

I have learned a great deal since I came on board here at The Daily Sheeple. I have read and listened to the opinions of many who are far further down the line of preparedness than I am, and although it may make me unpopular, I disagree with a some of what they say.

Of course agreeing or disagreeing with someone is purely personal choice. I am not saying they are wrong, just that I disagree with them.

Take for instance the charity aspect of prepping.

Many of the big names in prepping advocate that we should show solid Christian values in times of crisis and lay aside some essential items to give away to those that pass through who are less fortunate that ourselves.

NOT A CHANCE.

It has nothing to do with the fact that I have prepared, that I have scrimped and saved, and they possibly have not. It has nothing to do with greed on my part and to hell with all others. It has to do with the survival of my family.

A great deal is made on all prepping sites about OPSEC. Keeping low and not attracting attention, and this is where the trouble starts.

I know for a fact that if I had been given food, water and maybe a few other essential items by someone I passed along the way I would remember them.

I know that if the survival of my children was at stake and I couldn’t provide for them I would revisit the person that had assisted me in the hope of getting more supplies.

I know I would do anything I had to do to feed my kids, to keep them alive. Now if I could trade something, work for the food I would certainly do so. What happens though if the answer is no, we’re fine thanks, off you go?

Think about this….

 

At Home In The Wilderness Part II: Water

At Home In The Wilderness Part II: Water.

 

At Home In The Wilderness Part I: Shelter

At Home In The Wilderness Part I: Shelter.

 

Preparedness for Short Term Regional Disasters, by K.H.H. – SurvivalBlog.com

Preparedness for Short Term Regional Disasters, by K.H.H. – SurvivalBlog.com.

 

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