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US Drone "Intercepted" Over Crimea By Russian 'Self-Defense' Forces | Zero Hedge

US Drone “Intercepted” Over Crimea By Russian ‘Self-Defense’ Forces | Zero Hedge.

An American scout-attack drone, “almost invisible at a height of 4000 meters” has, according to AFP, been intercepted in the Crimean sky. Reports from the Russian state arms and technology group Rostec stated, judging by side-markings it was an MQ-5B drone – which is likely part of the 66th US Recon Brigade based in Bavaria. It was possible to break the drone’s link with its American operators with the help of the EW (electronic warfare) complex Avtobaza. As a result, the device made an emergency landing and passed into the possession of the self-defense forces almost unbroken.”

Via AFP,

An American scout-attack drone was intercepted in the Crimean sky, the Rostec state corporation reports. “Judging by side marking, the MQ-5B drone was part of the 66th US brigade of military intelligence with the main location in Bavaria,” the report on the website of the corporation reads.

According to the report, at the beginning of March, the American brigade was relocated to the Ukrainian Kirovohrad, from where drones commit reconnaissance raids in the direction of Crimea and Russian border areas.

Earlier, they reportedly appeared in the Kherson region, in the area of the Crimean roadblock Chongar. “According to some data, the American reconnaissance brigade had 18 MQ-5B drones in its arsenal. This is the second time the American UAV is intercepted over Crimea,” the report says.

The drone was at the height of about 4 thousand meters and was practically invisible from the earth. It was possible to break the drone’s link with its American operators with the help of the EW (electronic warfare) complex Avtobaza. As a result, the device made an emergency landing and passed into the possession of the self-defense forces almost unbroken,” the report says.

“Self-defense” it would appear does not cross a red-line (until Sunday).

It is perhaps ironic that the US is complaining abouit Russia’s military presence in Ukraine even as its own equipment is reportedly operating in the country.

What next: CIA spooks in Kiev inciting a violent coup, oh wait, that would be Libya or Egypt. And everyone knows what a success that way.

And as expected, the Pentagon promptly denied the drone belonged to the US. It denied it not the biblical three times, but four. They must really mean it.

Seeking expert opinion on who else has UAV MQ-5B drones. Pentagon say not playing semantics “No truth” its US. Asked four times, four ways.

— Peter Foster (@pmdfoster) March 14, 2014

US Drone “Intercepted” Over Crimea By Russian ‘Self-Defense’ Forces | Zero Hedge

US Drone “Intercepted” Over Crimea By Russian ‘Self-Defense’ Forces | Zero Hedge.

An American scout-attack drone, “almost invisible at a height of 4000 meters” has, according to AFP, been intercepted in the Crimean sky. Reports from the Russian state arms and technology group Rostec stated, judging by side-markings it was an MQ-5B drone – which is likely part of the 66th US Recon Brigade based in Bavaria. It was possible to break the drone’s link with its American operators with the help of the EW (electronic warfare) complex Avtobaza. As a result, the device made an emergency landing and passed into the possession of the self-defense forces almost unbroken.”

Via AFP,

An American scout-attack drone was intercepted in the Crimean sky, the Rostec state corporation reports. “Judging by side marking, the MQ-5B drone was part of the 66th US brigade of military intelligence with the main location in Bavaria,” the report on the website of the corporation reads.

According to the report, at the beginning of March, the American brigade was relocated to the Ukrainian Kirovohrad, from where drones commit reconnaissance raids in the direction of Crimea and Russian border areas.

Earlier, they reportedly appeared in the Kherson region, in the area of the Crimean roadblock Chongar. “According to some data, the American reconnaissance brigade had 18 MQ-5B drones in its arsenal. This is the second time the American UAV is intercepted over Crimea,” the report says.

The drone was at the height of about 4 thousand meters and was practically invisible from the earth. It was possible to break the drone’s link with its American operators with the help of the EW (electronic warfare) complex Avtobaza. As a result, the device made an emergency landing and passed into the possession of the self-defense forces almost unbroken,” the report says.

“Self-defense” it would appear does not cross a red-line (until Sunday).

It is perhaps ironic that the US is complaining abouit Russia’s military presence in Ukraine even as its own equipment is reportedly operating in the country.

What next: CIA spooks in Kiev inciting a violent coup, oh wait, that would be Libya or Egypt. And everyone knows what a success that way.

And as expected, the Pentagon promptly denied the drone belonged to the US. It denied it not the biblical three times, but four. They must really mean it.

Seeking expert opinion on who else has UAV MQ-5B drones. Pentagon say not playing semantics “No truth” its US. Asked four times, four ways.

— Peter Foster (@pmdfoster) March 14, 2014

Is a Policy a Law? Is Murder Murder? Washington’s Blog

Is a Policy a Law? Is Murder Murder? Washington’s Blog.

From the Associated Press:

“An American citizen who is a member of al-Qaida is actively planning attacks against Americans overseas, U.S. officials say, and the Obama administration is wrestling with whether to kill him with a drone strike and how to do so legally under its new stricter targeting policy issued last year.”

Notice those words: “legally” and “policy.”  No longer does U.S. media make a distinction between the two.  Under George W. Bush, detention without trial, torture, murder, warrantless spying, and secret missile strikes were illegal.  Under Obama they are policy.  And policy makes them “legal” under the modified Nixonian understanding that if the President does it as a policy then it is legal.

Under the U.S. Constitution, the laws of the nations in which drone murders take place, treaties to which the U.S. is party, international law, and U.S. statutory law, murdering people remains illegal, despite being policy, just as it was illegal under the less strict policy of some months back.  The policy was made stricter in order to bring it into closer compliance with the law, of course — though it comes nowhere close — and yet the previous policy remains somehow “legal,” too, despite having not been strict enough.

Under that previous policy, thousands of people, including at least four U.S. citizens, have been blown to bits with missiles. President Obama gave a speech last year in which he attempted to justify one of those four U.S. deaths on the basis of evidence he claimed to have but would not reveal. He made no attempt to justify the other three.

The new policy remains that the president can murder anyone, anywhere, along with whoever is near them, but must express angst if the person targeted is a U.S. citizen.

The idea that such lunacy can have anything to do with law is facilitated by human rights groups’ and the United Nations’ and international lawyers’ deference to the White House, which has been carried to the extreme of establishing a consensus that we cannot know whether a drone murder was legal or not unless the president reveals his reasoning, intention, motivation, and the details of the particular murder.

No other possible criminal receives this treatment. When the police read you your rights, you are not entitled to object: “Put those handcuffs away, sir! I have a written policy justifying everything I did, and I refuse to show it to you. Therefore you have no grounds to know for certain that my justification is as insane and twisted as you might imagine it to be based merely on what I’ve done! Away with you, sir!”

The loss of a coherent conception of law is a grievous one, but that’s not all that’s at stake here.

Numerous top U.S. officials routinely admit that our drone wars in the Middle East and Africa are creating more enemies than they kill.  General Stanley McChrystal, then commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan said in June 2010 that “for every innocent person you kill, you create 10 new enemies.” Veterans of U.S. kill teams in Iraq and Afghanistan interviewed in Jeremy Scahill’s book and film Dirty Wars said that whenever they worked their way through a list of people to kill, they were handed a larger list; the list grew as a result of working their way through it.  The wars on Iraq and Afghanistan, and the abuses of prisoners during them, became major recruiting tools for anti-U.S. terrorism. In 2006, U.S. intelligence agencies produced a National Intelligence Estimate that reached just that conclusion.

We are shredding the very concept of the rule of law in order to pursue a policy that endangers us, even as it helps to justify the erosion of our civil liberties, to damage the natural environment, and toimpoverish us, as it kills many innocent people.  Maybe they’ve secretly got drones doing the thinking as well as the killing.

Netanyahu Gambles on Cyber Opportunities Outside Israel – Bloomberg

Netanyahu Gambles on Cyber Opportunities Outside Israel – Bloomberg.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says the benefits of opening the country’s cyber industry to foreign partnerships can balance out security risks.

“There is tension” between security and business, he said in a Bloomberg Television interview in Davos, Switzerland, on Jan. 24. “I made a decision to take a gamble on expanding our cyber cooperation with companies and countries.”

Netanyahu’s comments suggest he may seek to loosen export licensing restrictions on cyber-related technologies after a stronger shekel and a faltering global economy led to a decline in the country’s sales abroad last year. Israel’s chief scientist, who runs a government project that invests in startups, last year urged an export policy reform that would balance national security needs with that of the industry.

“If you really want to extend the benefits of cyber security, then you need partners,” said Netanyahu, without directly commenting on the export policy. He met with heads of state and the chief executive of Yahoo! Inc. during his three days at the World Economic Forum in Davos last week.

Israel’s TheMarker.com financial news website reported today that multinationals including Microsoft Corp. and Amazon.com Inc. have said in private talks that they plan to open cyber centers in Israel. It didn’t say where it received the information.

Multinationals Present

Israel already has companies like Check Point Software Technologies Ltd. (CHKP), that trades in New York with a market value of $13 billion, and software security company Trusteer Inc. that International Business Machines Corp. bought for about $800 million last year.

Hackers briefly shut down several Israeli government websites last April in a coordinated assault protesting the treatment of Palestinians. Attacks against Web hosting servers and data centers are a growing threat, Bloomberg Industries said in a Jan. 16 report citing Cisco Systems Inc. (CSCO)Highly publicized attacks such as on the discount chain Target Corp. have raised the profile of network security providers.

“The Internet drives growth and everything is dependent on one thing, having security,” said Netanyahu. “We will balance our security needs with our business.”

Israel’s cyber-security industry has grown from a few dozen companies to more than 220 in the past three years, according to the Tel Aviv-based IVC Research Center that monitors the industry. Seventy-eight companies in the space raised more than $400 million during that period and 20 multinationals operate development centers in Israel.

Bureau Formed

Netanyahu established the National Cyber Bureau about two years ago to promote cyber security companies, coordinate between the military, education and business sectors, and start a high school program to train students early.

The industry is augmented by young men and women who serve at least two years in military cyber security units, offering the civilian sector a pool of experienced staff.

EMC Corp., the world’s largest maker of storage computers, said in November it will establish a second development center in Israel and expand activity at its first while developing solutions for the Israeli Defense ministry and military.

“There is a strong momentum in the cyber security sector and increasing interest from foreign financial, corporate and government investors,” IVC Chief Executive Officer Koby Simana said in a phone interview.

Boost Exports

Cyber technology will add to Israeli exports, that account for about a third of Israel’s economy and have been a growth engine for the past decade. Sales abroad contracted 0.1 percent last year, according to the Central Bureau of Statistics.

The Israeli currency has rallied 6.1 percent in the past 12 months, the most among 31 major currencies tracked by Bloomberg. Steps by authorities, which have included three rate cuts that brought borrowing costs down to 1 percent and Bank of Israel foreign currency purchases of more than $5 billion, have failed to stop the shekel’s ascent.

“I tell our exporters, who are very nimble mammals, that ultimately you have to adjust and that is hard,” Netanyahu said.

To contact the reporters on this story: Gwen Ackerman in Jerusalem atgackerman@bloomberg.netHans Nichols in Washington at hnichols2@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Riad Hamade at rhamade@bloomberg.net

Q&A: Privacy implications for aerial drones – Features – Al Jazeera English

Q&A: Privacy implications for aerial drones – Features – Al Jazeera English. (FULL ARTICLE)

New York, US – The Drones and Aerial Robotics conference – a weekend-long event highlighting innovations and uses in civilian drone technology – was a thing to behold.

A certain cognitive dissonance was necessary to ignore what many think of at the mention of the word “drone” (pilotless crafts used to kill thousands in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen). Instead, participants were urged to focus on how small, unarmed crafts carrying a camera and, perhaps, sensors could be used for educational and recreational purposes.

There were, of course, participants at the New York University conference who brought up the consequences of drone warfare, and others who questioned the legal issues surrounding the widespread use of civilian drones.

Woodrow Hartzog, an assistant law professor at Samford University in Alabama, was among those voices. He specialises in privacy, human-computer interactions and cyberlaw.

Al Jazeera: We’re at a conference where the focus seems to be on the whiz-bangery of this technology. What’s being lost in all this when it comes to privacy issues?

Woodrow Hartzog: There’s a fair amount of hand-wringing over drones and privacy, but I think in many instances it’s often dismissed because drones fly in public and they fly in public spaces and the law, as it’s traditionally been conceived, does not protect privacy when you’re walking out in the middle of the street. But I don’t think that’s entirely true….

 

Drones playing crucial role in East Asia – Asia-Pacific – Al Jazeera English

Drones playing crucial role in East Asia – Asia-Pacific – Al Jazeera English.

 

Google Spy Drones For Street View? | Zero Hedge

Google Spy Drones For Street View? | Zero Hedge.

 

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