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China Spurs Market Rout Blamed on Fed, Goldman Sachs AM Says – Bloomberg

China Spurs Market Rout Blamed on Fed, Goldman Sachs AM Says – Bloomberg.

By Benjamin Purvis and Candice Zachariahs  Feb 7, 2014 12:56 AM ET

China’s policy shifts are a bigger driver of the selloff in emerging markets than the Federal Reserve’s decision to dial back stimulus, according to Goldman Sachs Asset Management.

Volatility will rise toward its long-term average and that means an increase in risk premiums, said Philip Moffitt, head of fixed income in Sydney for Asia and the Pacific at Goldman Sachs Asset Management, which had $991 billion of assets under supervision worldwide as of September. The risks for different emerging economies will become more idiosyncratic and Mexico presents a buying opportunity following the rout, he said.

Markets from Turkey to South Africa and Argentina were roiled during the past month as investors sold off emerging-economy currencies, stocks and bonds, prompting emergency measures from governments and central banks. The bout of risk aversion follows the Fed’s decision to scale back asset purchases and China’s pledge to rein in leverage and give market forces a more decisive role in allocating resources.

“The selloff in emerging markets has much more to do with China than with Fed tapering,” Moffitt said yesterday in an interview in Sydney. “China’s such a big source of global demand, in particular for other emerging markets, uncertainty’s going to stay high and risk premiums should be expanding.”

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

Philip Moffitt, head of fixed income in Sydney for Asia and the Pacific at Goldman… Read More

Credit Boom

The worst isn’t over for emerging markets, Mark Mobius, who oversees more than $50 billion in developing nations as an executive chairman at Templeton Emerging Markets Group, said in an interview. Prices can decline further or take time to stabilize, he said.

China’s policy makers have attempted to rein in the unprecedented credit boom they unleashed in 2008-2009 amid the global financial crisis. Money market rates in China have surged, the cost of insuring against credit default by banks has increased and payment difficulties are emerging in the country’s $6 trillion shadow-banking industry.

“They’re looking to create a market that prices credit risk, rather than having prices imposed,” Moffitt said. “In the absence of a strong mechanism for pricing credit risk, there’s likely to be a lot of uncertainty and volatility.”

The world’s second-largest economy is predicted to expand by 7.4 percent this year, the slowest pace since 1990, according to the median estimate in a Bloomberg News survey.

Diverging Outlooks

The slowdown in China comes as the U.S. economy is showing signs of a pickup, allowing the Fed to trim its monthly bond purchases to $65 billion from $85 billion. U.S. growth is expected to accelerate to 2.8 percent in 2014 from 1.9 percent last year, according to a another Bloomberg poll.

Moffitt said investing in Mexico would be his top trade at the moment because the country’s fundamental outlook is strong even though it has been affected by the global selloff.

“There’s been outflow from emerging-market assets and when you get that kind of flow people sell what they can sell, often high-quality assets,” he said. “It will benefit from the strong U.S. growth we’re expecting and there’s the prospect for rate cuts, so Mexico stands out to us on both value and fundamentals.”

To contact the reporters on this story: Benjamin Purvis in Sydney at bpurvis@bloomberg.net; Candice Zachariahs in Sydney at czachariahs2@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Katrina Nicholas at knicholas2@bloomberg.net; Garfield Reynolds at greynolds1@bloomberg.net

Corporations Have Record Cash: They Also Have Record-er Debt, As Net Leverage Soars 15% Above Its 2008 Peak | Zero Hedge

Corporations Have Record Cash: They Also Have Record-er Debt, As Net Leverage Soars 15% Above Its 2008 Peak | Zero Hedge.

There is a reason why activism was the best performing hedge fund “strategy” of 2013: as we wrote and predicted back in November 2012 in “Where The Levered Corporate “Cash On The Sidelines” Is Truly Going“, US corporations – susceptible to soothing and not so soothing (ahem Icahn) suggestions by major shareholders – would lever to the hilt with cheap debt and use it all not for CapEx and growth, but for short-term shareholder gratification such as buybacks and dividends. A year later we found just how accurate this prediction would be when as we reported ten days ago US corporations invested a whopping half a trillion in buying back their stock, incidentally at all time high prices.

Putting aside the stupidity of this action for corporate IRRs, if not for activist hedge fund P&Ls, another finding has emerged, one that was also predicted back in 2012. Because in addition to still soaring mountains of cash, corporations have quietly amassed even greater mountains… of debt. In fact, as SocGen reveals, net debt, or total debt less cash, has risen to a new all time high, and is now 15% higher than it was at its prior peak just before the financial crisis!

From SocGen:

US corporates do indeed hold lots of cash, which is currently at record levels, but they also hold record levels of debt. Net debt (so discounting those massive cash piles) is 15% above the levels seen in 2008/09. The idea that corporates are paying down debt is simply not seen in the numbers. What is true is that deleveraging has occurred through the usual mechanism of higher asset prices (no doubt an aim of central bank policy). This is the painless form of deleveraging. It is also the most temporary, for a simple pull-back in equities and rise in volatility will put the problem back on centre stage.

 

And while it would be excusable if this debt had gone to prefund future growth, it is a travesty that the only thing companies have to show for it is that it has simply made a few already rich hedge fund managers even richer.

Inflation Vs Deflation – The Ultimate Chartbook Of ‘Monetary Tectonics’ | Zero Hedge

Inflation Vs Deflation – The Ultimate Chartbook Of ‘Monetary Tectonics’ | Zero Hedge.

Financial markets have become increasingly obviously highly dependent on central bank policies. In a follow-up to Incrementum’s previous chartbook, Stoerferle and Valek unveil the following 50 slide pack of 25 incredible charts to crucially enable prudent investors to grasp the consequences of the interplay between monetary inflation and deflation. They introduce the term “monetary tectonics’ to describe the ‘tug of war’ raging between parabolically rising monetary base M0 driven by extreme easy monetary policy and shrinking monetary aggregate M2 and M3 due to credit deleveraging. Critically, Incrementum explains how this applies to gold buying decisions as they introduce their “inflation signal” indicator.

GoldSilverWorlds.com has done a great job of summarizing the key aspects (and the full chartbook is below)…

The authors introduce the term “monetary tectonics” as a metaphor for this war. Similar to tectonic plates under a volcano, monetary inflation and deflation is currently working against each other:

  • Monetary inflation  is the result of a parabolically rising monetary base M0 driven by the central bank monetary easing policy.
  • Monetary deflation is the result of shrinking monetary aggregates M2 and M3 because of credit deleveraging.

The following chart clearly shows that 2013 was a pivot year in which the monetary base M0 grew exponentially while net M2 (expressed on the chart line as M2 minus M0) declined significantly.

deflating credit vs inflating monetary base 2000 2013 money currency

The chartbook shows several trend which confirm the deflationary monetary pressure:

  • Total credit market debt as a % of US GDP has been shrinking since 2007 (“debt deleveraging”).
  • US bank credit of all commercial banks is stagnating (close to negative growth), similar to the period 2007/2008. See first chart below.
  • Money supply growth in the US and the Eurozone is trending lower. See second chart below.
  • Personal consumption expenditures are exhibiting disinflation .
  • The gold/silver-Ratio is declining. Gold tends to outperform silver during disinflationary and/or deflationary periods.
  • The gold to Treasury ratio is declining. See third chart below.
  • The Continuous Commodity Index (CCI) has been in a steep decline since the fall of 2011.

US bank credit commercial banks growth 1974 till 2013 money currency

money supply growth M2 vs M3 1991 till 2013 money currency

gold to bond ratio 2002 2013 money currency

On the other hand, inflationary pressure is present through the following trends:

  • An explosion of the monetary base M0. See first chart below.
  • US households show signs of stopped deleveraging. See second chart below.
  • The currency in circulation keeps on expanding.
  • Commercial banks have piled up an enormous amount of excess reserves which, in case of a rate hike by central planners, could flood the market through lending in the fractional banking system. See thrid chart below.

US monetary base since 1918 money currency

US households stop deleveraging 1971 2013 money currency

excess reserves 2000 2013 money currency

How is gold impacted in this inflation vs deflation war? The key conclusion of the research is that, due to the fractional reserve banking system and the dynamics of the ‘monetary tectonics’, inflationary and deflationary phases will alternate in the foreseeable future. Gold, being a monetary asset in the view of Austrian economics, tends to rise in inflationary periods and decline during times of disinflation.

The key take-away for investors is to position themselves accordingly and consider price declines as buying opportunities for the coming inflationary period. How comes one can be so sure that inflation is coming? Consider that the government must avoid deflation; it is a horror scenario for the following reasons:

  • Price deflation results in a real increase in the value of debt and a nominal decline in asset values. Debt can no longer be serviced.
  • Price deflation would lead to massive tax revenue declines for the government due to a declining taxable base.
  • Deflation would have fatal consequences for large parts of the banking system.
  • Central banks also have the mandate to ensure ‘financial market stability‘

inflation deflation US Fed 200 years money currency

Interesting to know, Stoeferle and Valk developed the “Incrementum Inflation Signal,” an indicator of how much monetary inflation reaches the real economy based on market and monetary indicators. According to the signal, investors should take positions according to the the rising, neutral or falling inflation trends.

monetary seismograph incrementum inflation signal 2013 money currency

Monetary Tectonics Inflation vs Deflation Chartbook by Incrementum

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