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Daily Archives: March 14, 2014

Foreigners Sell A Record Amount, Over $100 Billion, Of Treasurys Held By The Fed In Past Week | Zero Hedge

Foreigners Sell A Record Amount, Over $100 Billion, Of Treasurys Held By The Fed In Past Week | Zero Hedge.

A month ago we reported that according to much delayed TIC data, China had just dumped the second-largest amount of US Treasurys in history. The problem, of course, with this data is that it is stale and very backward looking. For a much better, and up to date, indicator of what foreigners are doing with US Treasurys in near real time, the bond watchers keep track of a less known data series, called “Treasury Securities Held in Custody for Foreign Official and International Accounts” which as the name implies shows what foreigners are doing with their Treasury securities held in custody by the Fed on a weekly basis. So here it goes: in the just reported latest data, for the week ended March 12, Treasurys held in custody by the Fed dropped to $2.855 trillion: a drop of $104.5 billion. This was the biggest drop of Treasurys held by the Fed on record, i.e., foreigners were really busy selling.

This brings the total Treasury holdings in custody at the Fed to levels not seen since December 2012, a period during which the Fed alone has monetized well over $1 trillion in US paper.

So is this the proverbial beginning of foreign dumping of US paper? Could Russia simply have designated a different custodian of its holdings? No, because as of most recently it owned $139 billion in US paper, or well above the number “sold” and a custodial reallocation would mean all holdings are moved, not just a portion. For another view, here is what the bond experts at Stone McCarthy had to say:

We don’t have a ready explanation for the plunge in custody account holdings. One thing that is striking about the drop is that the last several days was not a period of heavy market buzz about “central bank selling” of Treasuries, at least to the best of our knowledge. China and Japan are by far the largest holders of Treasuries, with holdings of $1.269 trillion and $1.183 trillion in holdings at the end of December, respectively. China’s holdings are more skewed to central bank holdings. Selling of Treasuries would appear to be at odds with China’s recent effort to depreciate its currency, although on March 5 and 6 there was a brief correction in that trend.

As for the timing:

… the Wednesday-to-Wednesday decline was much larger than the weekly average decline in Treasury holdings of $46.6 billion. That implies that the plunge in Treasuries occurred later in week rather than earlier.

Some further thoughts from SocGen:

Weekly data from the Fed for US Treasury securities held in custody on behalf of foreign institutions and central banks fell sharply over the past week and may offer a plausible explanation as to why the USD has been offered pretty much all week against its major counterparts. EUR/USD in particular has stayed strongly bid since last week’s council meeting (to the bemusement of the ECB) and touched a high of 1.3967 yesterday before easing back after the exchange rate comments from president Draghi. The reduced appetite for USTs and strong demand for EUR debt and equity securities underlines the difficulties the ECB is encountering to stop the strong EUR from reducing inflation expectations in the euro area.

 

Foreign holdings of US government securities held at the Fed dropped by a whopping $104.5bn in the week to Wednesday 12 March according to the data published overnight (see chart below). This marks the biggest single weekly fall on record and compares with just a $13.5bn drop the previous week and a 4-week average fall of $1.5bn. The previous largest fall came in mid-2013 (26 June, a week after the FOMC meeting) when holdings fell by $32.4bn. The selling over the last week coincides with the latest US employment statistics, a run of weak data from China and the escalation of the situation in Crimea and Ukraine.

 

Russia has threatened to respond with sanctions of its own should economic measures be imposed by the EU and the US after the referendum in Crimea this weekend. Russia currently holds $138.6bn of USTs (based on December data) and the country has been a net seller for a combined $11.3bn of USTs over the last two months for when data is available. China sold $47.8bn alone in December. The latest Treasury International Capital (TIC) data for January are only due next week so we won’t find out officially until May how much Russia’s US government debt holdings dropped in March.

So either China selling TSYs and buying EURs to make European import power stronger, if not so much its exports (much to Draghi’s ongoing horror). Or Russia, which may be dumping USTs to support the ruble… Or dumping just because.

Russia Warns Of East Ukraine Invasion To "Defend Compatriots", EU Threatens Gazprom, Rosneft CEOs With Visa Ban | Zero Hedge

Russia Warns Of East Ukraine Invasion To “Defend Compatriots”, EU Threatens Gazprom, Rosneft CEOs With Visa Ban | Zero Hedge.

While Russia has been massively piling up troops next to Ukraine’s eastern border, one thing that was missing to allow the crossing of the border was a provocation, aka the proverbial spark to give Moscow the green light to “defend” Russian citizens in the East. It may have just gotten that last night, when as previously reported, clashes in the eastern city of Donetsk between pro-Ukraine and pro-Russian civilians turned lethal, killing at least one person and dozens injured. A clip of the clashes can be seen below:

 

Needless to say, this escalation was just the green light Russia needed. As Reuters reports, the Russian Foreign Ministry, responding to the death of at least one protester in Ukraine’s eastern city of Donetsk, repeated President Vladimir Putin’s declaration of the right to invade to protect Russian citizens and “compatriots”.

“Russia is aware of its responsibility for the lives of compatriots and fellow citizens in Ukraine and reserves the right to take people under its protection,” it said. Curiously, organizers of the anti-Moscow demonstration said the dead man was from their group. That, however, is irrelevant, and in the fog of war, when tank batalions enter a country to “defend” select citizens, mistake are made.

In the meantime, and as we have been reporting since day one, Russian troops continue to gather:

A Reuters reporting team watched a Russian warship unload trucks, troops and at least one armored personnel carrier at Kazachaya bay near Sevastopol on Friday morning. Trucks drove off a ramp from the Yamal 156, a large landing ship that can carry more than 300 troops and up to a dozen APCs.

As also reported before, the key event in the coming days is the Crimean referendum whether to join Russia. Which is why a doomed last ditch diplomatic scramble has seen John Kerry rush to London where he later today he will meet Russian foreign minister Lavrov in a final attempt to diffuse the situation. The attempt will fail.

Summarizing it best, or perhaps just waking from a month-long nap, was the Estonian defense minister, Urmas Reinsalum who suddenly appears agitated to quite agitated:

  • PUTIN IS PREPARING TO INVADE EASTERN UKRAINE: ESTONIAN DEF MIN
  • UKRAINE EVENTS CLEARLY SHOW RUSSIA ONLY ACCEPTS FORCE: ESTONIAN DEF MIN

Hardly anyone is surprised there…

But perhaps the biggest news so far this morning is that the EU is considering visa bans to 13 Russian politicians and industry leaders, which according to Germany’s Bild, include the headest hocnho of all: Gazprom CEO Alexei Miller. From Reuters:

Visa bans threatened by the European Union and United States should Crimea vote to join Russia in a referendum would target at least 13 Russian politicians and industry leaders including Vladimir Putin’s close aides, Germany’s Bild newspaper reported.

The visa ban list includes Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu, Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin, head of the presidential administration Sergei Ivanov, the secretary of the National Security Council Nikolai Patrushev, as well as several of Putin’s advisors, Bild said in an advance copy of a report to be published on Saturday. The report cited diplomatic sources in Brussels and Washington.

Visa bans could also be slapped on the chief executive of Russian energy firm Gazprom Alexei Miller, and Igor Sechin, head of Russia’s top crude oil producer Rosneft .

Remember, it is all about the gas. And if Europe “forces” Russia’s hand by denying Gazprom free access, then Gazprom will have no choice but to retaliate. At that point all bets are off.

Russia Warns Of East Ukraine Invasion To “Defend Compatriots”, EU Threatens Gazprom, Rosneft CEOs With Visa Ban | Zero Hedge

Russia Warns Of East Ukraine Invasion To “Defend Compatriots”, EU Threatens Gazprom, Rosneft CEOs With Visa Ban | Zero Hedge.

While Russia has been massively piling up troops next to Ukraine’s eastern border, one thing that was missing to allow the crossing of the border was a provocation, aka the proverbial spark to give Moscow the green light to “defend” Russian citizens in the East. It may have just gotten that last night, when as previously reported, clashes in the eastern city of Donetsk between pro-Ukraine and pro-Russian civilians turned lethal, killing at least one person and dozens injured. A clip of the clashes can be seen below:

 

Needless to say, this escalation was just the green light Russia needed. As Reuters reports, the Russian Foreign Ministry, responding to the death of at least one protester in Ukraine’s eastern city of Donetsk, repeated President Vladimir Putin’s declaration of the right to invade to protect Russian citizens and “compatriots”.

“Russia is aware of its responsibility for the lives of compatriots and fellow citizens in Ukraine and reserves the right to take people under its protection,” it said. Curiously, organizers of the anti-Moscow demonstration said the dead man was from their group. That, however, is irrelevant, and in the fog of war, when tank batalions enter a country to “defend” select citizens, mistake are made.

In the meantime, and as we have been reporting since day one, Russian troops continue to gather:

A Reuters reporting team watched a Russian warship unload trucks, troops and at least one armored personnel carrier at Kazachaya bay near Sevastopol on Friday morning. Trucks drove off a ramp from the Yamal 156, a large landing ship that can carry more than 300 troops and up to a dozen APCs.

As also reported before, the key event in the coming days is the Crimean referendum whether to join Russia. Which is why a doomed last ditch diplomatic scramble has seen John Kerry rush to London where he later today he will meet Russian foreign minister Lavrov in a final attempt to diffuse the situation. The attempt will fail.

Summarizing it best, or perhaps just waking from a month-long nap, was the Estonian defense minister, Urmas Reinsalum who suddenly appears agitated to quite agitated:

  • PUTIN IS PREPARING TO INVADE EASTERN UKRAINE: ESTONIAN DEF MIN
  • UKRAINE EVENTS CLEARLY SHOW RUSSIA ONLY ACCEPTS FORCE: ESTONIAN DEF MIN

Hardly anyone is surprised there…

But perhaps the biggest news so far this morning is that the EU is considering visa bans to 13 Russian politicians and industry leaders, which according to Germany’s Bild, include the headest hocnho of all: Gazprom CEO Alexei Miller. From Reuters:

Visa bans threatened by the European Union and United States should Crimea vote to join Russia in a referendum would target at least 13 Russian politicians and industry leaders including Vladimir Putin’s close aides, Germany’s Bild newspaper reported.

The visa ban list includes Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu, Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin, head of the presidential administration Sergei Ivanov, the secretary of the National Security Council Nikolai Patrushev, as well as several of Putin’s advisors, Bild said in an advance copy of a report to be published on Saturday. The report cited diplomatic sources in Brussels and Washington.

Visa bans could also be slapped on the chief executive of Russian energy firm Gazprom Alexei Miller, and Igor Sechin, head of Russia’s top crude oil producer Rosneft .

Remember, it is all about the gas. And if Europe “forces” Russia’s hand by denying Gazprom free access, then Gazprom will have no choice but to retaliate. At that point all bets are off.

After Ukraine, Turkey might be the Next Target of “Regime Change” | Global Research

After Ukraine, Turkey might be the Next Target of “Regime Change” | Global Research.

Global Research, March 14, 2014
white moon and star turkey map

The plot and the leading actors are almost the same. Just change the backdrop. Throw in the diplomatic and intelligence machinations into the mix and you have a recipe for regime change.  A corrupt leader backed by a powerful next-door neighbour or an overseas sponsor. Internal dissent in the form of mass, on going, and very violent protests, which lead to several deaths in the streets due to confrontation between riot police and demonstrators. Calls for resignation of the (elected) leader and foreign forces manipulating events by meddling in the internal affairs of a sovereign state.

After US-EU backed palace coup in Kiev is Ankara the next target?

Yes, this sounds very much like pre-putsch Ukraine, doesn’t it? But what if we look across the Black sea to a powerful regional US alley, and key NATO member state (NATO’s second largest standing army in terms of troop numbers): Turkey. The same template or scenario for a popular uprising or potential for  “regime change” can just as well be applied to that country. Sound exaggerated? Let’s see then.

The whole world knows that, Turkey is currently racked by inner or domestic instability. But unlike Ukraine or Arab states which saw their leaders overthrown in successive revolutions as part of the euphemistically termed “Arab Spring”, the Turkish leader has applied methods not unlike his archenemy President Assad of Syria, to remain in power.

Tactics used such as the systematic persecution of opposition and trade union leaders, journalists, censorship of social media etc. have not gone unnoticed in the EU and the US.  The imprisonment without trial of political dissenters or dissidents (to use the old cold war word) has become a common, or everyday occurrence in Turkey. Hence, the brutality of the ruling AKP (Development and Justice Party) regime makes the reign of ousted (yet democratically elected) President Yanucovitch, seem almost like life in Arcadia or Shangri la by contrast.

 Erdogan’s iron fisted rule over his country has become wearisome for many of the country’s denizens, over the past year or so. How has the west and especially Turkey’s biggest sponsor (the US) reacted to his anti-democratic and at times paranoid (He has accused foreign powers or outside forces, including Israel, and individuals like Fethullah Gulen, of subverting his rule or plotting his demise.) behaviour?  With a slight tap on the wrist or maybe a gentle rebuke or two.

Until Yanukovitch’s overthrow Washington denounced this “Russian puppet” as a corrupt and despotic ruler over Ukraine. However during this same period, and up until now, the US has conspicuously remained strangely mute, about the turbulent events in Turkey. Is there a double standard here, or am I misreading the situation?

But beneath the surface tensions between Turkey and the US are rising. Washington seems displeased with Erdogan’s rule. Might regime change in Turkey be on the menu at the White House? Hard to tell at this point, but Washington’s patience with Erdogan is certainly not unlimited; in other words, it’s running out. As the March 30th municipal elections approach things will get very dicey in the country indeed and Washington’s support for the AKP may begin to wane.

A Ukrainian style “crescent moon” revolution on the way in Turkey?

Reccip Tayyip Erogan has since June 2013 been faced with waves of protest in his country. These protest continue  . He has been exposed recently as a corrupt, venal, authoritarian and some say even a megalomaniac. He’s has done everything to maintain his grip on power, including purging the police, and security and judicial apparatus. His ruthlessness seemingly knows no bounds. The constant repression has reached a tipping point: either more dictatorial style domestic policies will continue or a popular “democratic” and “home-grown” uprising backed by shadowy groups, like the ones currently operating in Ukraine will likely materialise.   The Ukraine scenario of course, is based on outside interference in the internal affairs of a sovereign country.

Fomenting a coup in Turkey is far more complicated, due to the country’s immense strategic importance to the west. As well, the only leading actors capable of overthrowing the current, graft- ridden, regime (as in the case of Egypt most recently) is the military. There have been several military coups in Turkey’ history. So this cannot be excluded (some with US assistance).

Ukraine’ Crimean secessionist movement mirrors that of Kurds in Turkey

With the potential of Crimea seceding from the rest of Ukraine or possible reuniting with Russia, Kurds in Turkey who have fought for decades for an independent homeland might be looking closely at the outcome of the referendum there. Moreover, after decades of armed conflict there is a very tenuous peace in that part of eastern Turkey. But growing secessionist movements, clamouring for more regional autonomy (triggered by the Ukraine crisis in the region), might rekindle nationalists’ fervour in Turkish Kurdistan. This could destabilise Turkey further and add to the long sanding domestic internal turmoil.

After Ukraine, Turkey might be the Next Target of “Regime Change” | Global Research

After Ukraine, Turkey might be the Next Target of “Regime Change” | Global Research.

Global Research, March 14, 2014
white moon and star turkey map

The plot and the leading actors are almost the same. Just change the backdrop. Throw in the diplomatic and intelligence machinations into the mix and you have a recipe for regime change.  A corrupt leader backed by a powerful next-door neighbour or an overseas sponsor. Internal dissent in the form of mass, on going, and very violent protests, which lead to several deaths in the streets due to confrontation between riot police and demonstrators. Calls for resignation of the (elected) leader and foreign forces manipulating events by meddling in the internal affairs of a sovereign state.

After US-EU backed palace coup in Kiev is Ankara the next target?

Yes, this sounds very much like pre-putsch Ukraine, doesn’t it? But what if we look across the Black sea to a powerful regional US alley, and key NATO member state (NATO’s second largest standing army in terms of troop numbers): Turkey. The same template or scenario for a popular uprising or potential for  “regime change” can just as well be applied to that country. Sound exaggerated? Let’s see then.

The whole world knows that, Turkey is currently racked by inner or domestic instability. But unlike Ukraine or Arab states which saw their leaders overthrown in successive revolutions as part of the euphemistically termed “Arab Spring”, the Turkish leader has applied methods not unlike his archenemy President Assad of Syria, to remain in power.

Tactics used such as the systematic persecution of opposition and trade union leaders, journalists, censorship of social media etc. have not gone unnoticed in the EU and the US.  The imprisonment without trial of political dissenters or dissidents (to use the old cold war word) has become a common, or everyday occurrence in Turkey. Hence, the brutality of the ruling AKP (Development and Justice Party) regime makes the reign of ousted (yet democratically elected) President Yanucovitch, seem almost like life in Arcadia or Shangri la by contrast.

 Erdogan’s iron fisted rule over his country has become wearisome for many of the country’s denizens, over the past year or so. How has the west and especially Turkey’s biggest sponsor (the US) reacted to his anti-democratic and at times paranoid (He has accused foreign powers or outside forces, including Israel, and individuals like Fethullah Gulen, of subverting his rule or plotting his demise.) behaviour?  With a slight tap on the wrist or maybe a gentle rebuke or two.

Until Yanukovitch’s overthrow Washington denounced this “Russian puppet” as a corrupt and despotic ruler over Ukraine. However during this same period, and up until now, the US has conspicuously remained strangely mute, about the turbulent events in Turkey. Is there a double standard here, or am I misreading the situation?

But beneath the surface tensions between Turkey and the US are rising. Washington seems displeased with Erdogan’s rule. Might regime change in Turkey be on the menu at the White House? Hard to tell at this point, but Washington’s patience with Erdogan is certainly not unlimited; in other words, it’s running out. As the March 30th municipal elections approach things will get very dicey in the country indeed and Washington’s support for the AKP may begin to wane.

A Ukrainian style “crescent moon” revolution on the way in Turkey?

Reccip Tayyip Erogan has since June 2013 been faced with waves of protest in his country. These protest continue  . He has been exposed recently as a corrupt, venal, authoritarian and some say even a megalomaniac. He’s has done everything to maintain his grip on power, including purging the police, and security and judicial apparatus. His ruthlessness seemingly knows no bounds. The constant repression has reached a tipping point: either more dictatorial style domestic policies will continue or a popular “democratic” and “home-grown” uprising backed by shadowy groups, like the ones currently operating in Ukraine will likely materialise.   The Ukraine scenario of course, is based on outside interference in the internal affairs of a sovereign country.

Fomenting a coup in Turkey is far more complicated, due to the country’s immense strategic importance to the west. As well, the only leading actors capable of overthrowing the current, graft- ridden, regime (as in the case of Egypt most recently) is the military. There have been several military coups in Turkey’ history. So this cannot be excluded (some with US assistance).

Ukraine’ Crimean secessionist movement mirrors that of Kurds in Turkey

With the potential of Crimea seceding from the rest of Ukraine or possible reuniting with Russia, Kurds in Turkey who have fought for decades for an independent homeland might be looking closely at the outcome of the referendum there. Moreover, after decades of armed conflict there is a very tenuous peace in that part of eastern Turkey. But growing secessionist movements, clamouring for more regional autonomy (triggered by the Ukraine crisis in the region), might rekindle nationalists’ fervour in Turkish Kurdistan. This could destabilise Turkey further and add to the long sanding domestic internal turmoil.

Sound Money – Podcasts from money experts around the world. | Casey Research

Sound Money – Podcasts from money experts around the world. | Casey Research.

Complete Breakdown of Financial Controls in US Government, Says Austin Fitts

February 23, 2014

Former HUD Assistant Housing Secretary and investment advisor Catherine Austin Fitts reveals her thoughts on the ever-rising debt ceiling… what Obamacare is really about (and that’s not socialized healthcare)… why over $4 trillion missing from federal programs may not be incompetence, but a covert strategy… how to protect yourself from the constant devaluation of the US dollar… and what exactly the Popsicle Index measures and why it matters.

Here are a few excerpts:

“I don’t see Obamacare as something designed to offer healthcare. … I think the question comes down to a bigger one, which is, are we going to create a society where one hundred percent of everything is digitized and under central control?”

“Who is the governance system, and why are they behaving the way they are behaving? What we see is literally a psychopathic effort and intensity—whether it is in the energy area, whether it is in the currency area, whether it is in the food area, whether it is in the healthcare area—to get 100% central control and to use digital means to do it, and the question is why?”

“Well, you have a complete breakdown of internal financial controls in the US government. … You had over $4 trillion of what is called undocumentable adjustments and to this day, [these agencies] have never, as required by law, produced audited financial statements.”

“In my experience, government is not incompetent at all. … Gridlock is a cover story, incompetence is a cover story. There is a plan, you just can’t see what it is.”

Sat, 22 February 2014

Host Andy Duncan speaks to the publisher of the Solari Report and President of Solari Inc, Catherine Austin Fitts.  Topics include quality of life indicator – The Popsicle Index, the selective efficiency of government, the debt ceiling, and investing in gold.


Sound Money – Podcasts from money experts around the world. | Casey Research

Sound Money – Podcasts from money experts around the world. | Casey Research.

Complete Breakdown of Financial Controls in US Government, Says Austin Fitts

February 23, 2014

Former HUD Assistant Housing Secretary and investment advisor Catherine Austin Fitts reveals her thoughts on the ever-rising debt ceiling… what Obamacare is really about (and that’s not socialized healthcare)… why over $4 trillion missing from federal programs may not be incompetence, but a covert strategy… how to protect yourself from the constant devaluation of the US dollar… and what exactly the Popsicle Index measures and why it matters.

Here are a few excerpts:

“I don’t see Obamacare as something designed to offer healthcare. … I think the question comes down to a bigger one, which is, are we going to create a society where one hundred percent of everything is digitized and under central control?”

“Who is the governance system, and why are they behaving the way they are behaving? What we see is literally a psychopathic effort and intensity—whether it is in the energy area, whether it is in the currency area, whether it is in the food area, whether it is in the healthcare area—to get 100% central control and to use digital means to do it, and the question is why?”

“Well, you have a complete breakdown of internal financial controls in the US government. … You had over $4 trillion of what is called undocumentable adjustments and to this day, [these agencies] have never, as required by law, produced audited financial statements.”

“In my experience, government is not incompetent at all. … Gridlock is a cover story, incompetence is a cover story. There is a plan, you just can’t see what it is.”

Sat, 22 February 2014

Host Andy Duncan speaks to the publisher of the Solari Report and President of Solari Inc, Catherine Austin Fitts.  Topics include quality of life indicator – The Popsicle Index, the selective efficiency of government, the debt ceiling, and investing in gold.


In health and nutrition, what’s old is suddenly new again | The Daily Sheeple

In health and nutrition, what’s old is suddenly new again | The Daily Sheeple.

NaturalNews Network
NaturalNews.com
March 14th, 2014

 Eggs

When it comes to health and nutrition, it seems like everything old is new again. Many foods or health protocols that used to be commonly enjoyed were later attacked and discredited by industry-funded “scientists” trying to sell toxic substitutes like vegetable oil or aspartame.

But as health awareness has radically increased over the last two decades, many “old” things are new again. In this article, I share my list on many of these “old” things which are suddenly back in vogue.

What’s old is suddenly new

• Local food – Before the rise of factory foods, nearly all food was local. As a result, it was also far healthier and more nutritious than today’s centrally-manufactured, distributed foods (think McDonald’s Chicken McNuggets).

Now, thanks to the rise of the local food movement, CSAs and farmers markets, local food is popular again. It also happens to be ecologically sustainable. If humanity is to survive the next century, it must do so by learning how to produce local decentralized food.

• Sunlight – Once praised as a health treatment all by itself, sunlight has been relentlessly attacked by dermatologists and the cancer industry who have encouraged massive vitamin D deficiencies across the population. But now, as the importance of vitamin D is coming back to light, more and more people are turning to sensible sunshine exposure as a powerful, genuine health treatment with remarkable anti-cancer benefits.

• Eggs – The vicious campaign attacking eggs — waged throughout the 1970′s and 1980′s — was based entirely on junk science and deceptive dietary advice. Whole eggs, it turns out, are very healthy when produced by truly free-range chickens that aren’t fed GMOs, pesticides and chemicals. Today,people recognize this again, and more people are not just buying eggs but even raising their own chickens (like I do).

• Butter – Like eggs, butter was also maligned by prostitute-scientists spreading Big Food propaganda to sell partially hydrogenated oils and “buttery spreads” or margarine. Today, however, society has finally come to realize that hydrogenated oils are poison. Real butter, it seems, is actually a whole lot better for you than fake butters. And margarine is now largely seen as cheap food eaten by low-income people who can’t afford real butter.

• Neti pots and nasal rinses – Used throughout human history, nasal rinsing is a practice traced back to the dawn of civilization. But during the rise of the antibiotics era, personal hygiene took a back seat to the more “scientific” protocol of taking antibiotics instead of just rinsing your sinuses. But the age of antibiotics is now coming to an end as physician-assisted abuse of antibiotics spurred the development and spread of deadly superbugs. Suddenly, rinsing your nasal passages with salt water seems a whole lot wiser than popping superbug-inducing chemical pills.

• Sugar – Cane sugar has been relentlessly attacked as the enemy of health. But it turns out that artificial sweeteners like aspartame and sucralose are a lot more worrisome than sugar — especially if the sugar is minimally processed (evaporated cane juice crystals). High-fructose corn syrup is also now widely believed to be far more disease-promoting than cane sugar, and many people actually seek out sodas sweetened with real sugar rather than corn syrup.

• Eyeglasses – Contacts involve the use of cleaning chemicals which have preservatives that lead to eye irritation with long-term use. That’s why some people experience eye irritation and are now returning to using eyeglasses. Even though contacts made glasses “old fashioned” for a while, glasses are coming back into their own as many people find them more natural and comfortable than contact lenses.

• Natural hair color – For many people, the age of poisoning yourself with toxic hair dyes is over. Natural colors are back in style, and in many ways natural gray shows wisdom rather than a desperate, contrived effort to feign youth.

• Face-to-face conversations – During the rise of social media giants like Facebook, people thought it would be cool to connect with each other online. But now the truth has become obvious to nearly everyone: “connecting” online isn’t much of a connection at all. What people really crave is human interaction, not meaningless, electronically-fabricated social circles.

In addition, here’s a short list of a few other foods and health that are suddenly back in style:

• Red wine (and resveratrol)
• Raw milk
• Cloth diapers
• Plant-based diets
• Home schooling
• Full-spectrum healthy salts
• Avocados (which were long attacked as containing too much fat)
• Vitamin C
• Organic coffee

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple

 

In health and nutrition, what’s old is suddenly new again | The Daily Sheeple

In health and nutrition, what’s old is suddenly new again | The Daily Sheeple.

NaturalNews Network
NaturalNews.com
March 14th, 2014

 Eggs

When it comes to health and nutrition, it seems like everything old is new again. Many foods or health protocols that used to be commonly enjoyed were later attacked and discredited by industry-funded “scientists” trying to sell toxic substitutes like vegetable oil or aspartame.

But as health awareness has radically increased over the last two decades, many “old” things are new again. In this article, I share my list on many of these “old” things which are suddenly back in vogue.

What’s old is suddenly new

• Local food – Before the rise of factory foods, nearly all food was local. As a result, it was also far healthier and more nutritious than today’s centrally-manufactured, distributed foods (think McDonald’s Chicken McNuggets).

Now, thanks to the rise of the local food movement, CSAs and farmers markets, local food is popular again. It also happens to be ecologically sustainable. If humanity is to survive the next century, it must do so by learning how to produce local decentralized food.

• Sunlight – Once praised as a health treatment all by itself, sunlight has been relentlessly attacked by dermatologists and the cancer industry who have encouraged massive vitamin D deficiencies across the population. But now, as the importance of vitamin D is coming back to light, more and more people are turning to sensible sunshine exposure as a powerful, genuine health treatment with remarkable anti-cancer benefits.

• Eggs – The vicious campaign attacking eggs — waged throughout the 1970′s and 1980′s — was based entirely on junk science and deceptive dietary advice. Whole eggs, it turns out, are very healthy when produced by truly free-range chickens that aren’t fed GMOs, pesticides and chemicals. Today,people recognize this again, and more people are not just buying eggs but even raising their own chickens (like I do).

• Butter – Like eggs, butter was also maligned by prostitute-scientists spreading Big Food propaganda to sell partially hydrogenated oils and “buttery spreads” or margarine. Today, however, society has finally come to realize that hydrogenated oils are poison. Real butter, it seems, is actually a whole lot better for you than fake butters. And margarine is now largely seen as cheap food eaten by low-income people who can’t afford real butter.

• Neti pots and nasal rinses – Used throughout human history, nasal rinsing is a practice traced back to the dawn of civilization. But during the rise of the antibiotics era, personal hygiene took a back seat to the more “scientific” protocol of taking antibiotics instead of just rinsing your sinuses. But the age of antibiotics is now coming to an end as physician-assisted abuse of antibiotics spurred the development and spread of deadly superbugs. Suddenly, rinsing your nasal passages with salt water seems a whole lot wiser than popping superbug-inducing chemical pills.

• Sugar – Cane sugar has been relentlessly attacked as the enemy of health. But it turns out that artificial sweeteners like aspartame and sucralose are a lot more worrisome than sugar — especially if the sugar is minimally processed (evaporated cane juice crystals). High-fructose corn syrup is also now widely believed to be far more disease-promoting than cane sugar, and many people actually seek out sodas sweetened with real sugar rather than corn syrup.

• Eyeglasses – Contacts involve the use of cleaning chemicals which have preservatives that lead to eye irritation with long-term use. That’s why some people experience eye irritation and are now returning to using eyeglasses. Even though contacts made glasses “old fashioned” for a while, glasses are coming back into their own as many people find them more natural and comfortable than contact lenses.

• Natural hair color – For many people, the age of poisoning yourself with toxic hair dyes is over. Natural colors are back in style, and in many ways natural gray shows wisdom rather than a desperate, contrived effort to feign youth.

• Face-to-face conversations – During the rise of social media giants like Facebook, people thought it would be cool to connect with each other online. But now the truth has become obvious to nearly everyone: “connecting” online isn’t much of a connection at all. What people really crave is human interaction, not meaningless, electronically-fabricated social circles.

In addition, here’s a short list of a few other foods and health that are suddenly back in style:

• Red wine (and resveratrol)
• Raw milk
• Cloth diapers
• Plant-based diets
• Home schooling
• Full-spectrum healthy salts
• Avocados (which were long attacked as containing too much fat)
• Vitamin C
• Organic coffee

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Is the Earth overpopulated? » peoplesworld

Is the Earth overpopulated? » peoplesworld.

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Recently I’ve been facilitating two groups studying global warming. (I will send my annotated 10-book syllabus to anyone who asks for it). Our current discussions are based on Alan Weisman’s new book, “Countdown.”While the book contains statements indicating it is not so simple, Weisman’s main point is that overpopulation is at the core of our environmental problems.

I’ve also been reading Clive Ponting’s “A New Green History of the World.” Ponting concludes that: “The current environmental problems in the world can only be understood in the context of the nature of the world economy produced since 1500.”

At first glance these points of view appear to restate the old argument between Malthus and Marx. Malthus argued in 1798 that food production could never match population growth, and so, the masses were doomed to starvation. Marx, on the other hand, maintained that there would be enough for everyone if the earth’s resources were distributed fairly. He attacked Malthus for placing blame on the victims of capitalist exploitation rather than on the capitalists, who were the real culprits.

Raised by two sets of Old Left parents, and coming of age as a New Left Marxist, I initially rejected all claims that we could eliminate poverty and environmental damage through population control. However, in 1798 when Malthus first staked out his position, there were fewer than one billion people on the planet, and when Marx critiqued him there were no more than 1.5 billion. The world’s population has recently topped 7 billion, and is headed for nine or ten billion in the next several decades. Marx was right that when Malthus propounded his theory it was a self-serving defense of inequality, but since then, overpopulation has become a major problem.

I also agree with Ponting that the world’s current unequal distribution of resources is responsible for environmentally-devastating first world overconsumption and mass human suffering. But capitalism’s love affair with increasing population is a key part of the current global economy. More people equals more workers willing to work for less as they compete with each other. More consumers buy more, generating more profit. A system based on perpetual growth serves its principal beneficiaries when individuals consume more AND there are more individuals doing the consuming. Is it possible that Weisman and Ponting are both correct?

Seven billion people are way too many, and 10 billion will just hasten disaster. Weisman’s point is well-taken; we must and can bring down the population through universal education, and government assisted family planning programs, and doing so is a necessary condition of controlling global warming. Weisman, laments that all we lack is the political will to do so. He writes: “why [are] health decisions about Mother Nature … made by politicians, not by scientists who know how critical her condition is.” But as Ponting makes plain, the nature of our global economy means that politicians serving multinational corporate masters will continue to make such decisions. As long as the world’s economy is driven by competition, profit and growth, efforts to reduce substantially either our population or consumption will be ineffective.

It is not a question of one or the other. Both are essential and we must address them in conjunction.

This article originally appeared at the Robert Meeropol’s blog.

Photo: Tomonari Suzuoki CC

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